4 fall gardening tips that will save you money all year long

While spring tends to be the most popular season to tend to your garden, fall is a far better time to tend to your landscape. Before the freezing temperatures of winter set in, try these gardening tips to save money all year long.

BUY PLANTS FOR LESS

Nurseries and garden centers tend to put their stock on sale in the fall to avoid having to store it over the winter. You could potentially save up to 50% on plants, grass seed and even tools.

Better yet, skip the nursery and get your plants for free. Fall is the best time to “divide” spring-flowering perennials – simply cut a piece, roots and all, off your favorite plant from the yards of friends and neighbors (with their permission, of course) and find a spot for them in your yard. Just make sure to have everything in the ground at least six weeks before your average first ground-freeze date.

GROW A HEALTHIER LAWN

The typical cool and rainy fall weather is the perfect combination for your yard to be thick and strong enough to compete with the weeds in the spring. Wait to seed until then though and you’ll probably have to repeat the treatment which can cost upwards of $100.

FERTILIZE BEDS

Fertilizing your garden now could cut the amount of time and money you’ll spending feeding and watering over the next year in half. Even though the air temperature is dropping, the ground remains warm which encourages plants to focus their energy on root growth. The healthier the plant, the stronger and longer it will grow.

SAVE ON SPRING BLOOMS

Fall is the only season you can plant spring-blooming bulbs such as tulips. Cut the cost of a bulk order with friends and family, dig a small hole, drop in a bulb, cover with soil and enjoy cheap, colorful flowers for years to come.

Use the above fall gardening tips to keep more money in your pocket year round. Check out our financial literacy news section to learn more money saving tips from your neighborhood credit union.

Editor’s note: Segments of this article were taken from time.com/money.